ASRock 990FX Motherboard Extreme9 Comes with Support for up to 5GHz Processor Speed

Advance Micro Devices (AMD) has introduced the FX-9590 processor as today’s fastest CPUs. But unfortunately not all motherboards available on the market capable of supporting the performance of the processor. It is also used by ASRock to introduce a new motherboard that supports the processor at speeds up to 5GHz.

The motherboard is ASRock 990FX Extreme9. This motherboard also has to undergo various tests to determine the quality in it. Not only that, this motherboard also has the updated BIOS in order to run the latest processors from AMD.

In some benchmark tests, this motherboard also provides significant performance improvements. In Super P1MB test, the obtained results motherboard 18.377 seconds. Also in PC Mark Vantage test, the results obtained for 18 894, an increase of 15:31 per cent compared to the previous generation of chips.

The motherboard comes with four PCI Express 2.0 x16 slots, four DDR3 memory slots, and SATA 6Gbps ports. This motherboard also comes with a 12 +2 phase power design, Hi-Density Power connector, Dual Stack MOSFET and others.

NUC, Small PC but powerful

A few days later, I was tested the Intel Next Unit of Computing (NUC) that the new board. Even the box is written in Pre-Production Engineering Sample. So still a production example, not yet in production, may not even be sold widely.

If summarized in a few words, then Intel NUC that I use a small computer with the ability of cayenne pepper for approximately 75% of Server Quad Xeon E31220.

Desktop Computer Intel NUC is a very, very small. The size is approximately 11cm x 11cm x 4cm so it can be easily handheld hands. May be quite right if called as handheld computers hehehe …

The outer display is very compact Intel NUC all. It even comes in a hook to stick in the back of a digital TV screen / monitor. Adapter used is ordinary laptop adapter, with a voltage of 19V with 65W power.

For connection to the outside world, Intel NUC equipped with three USB ports. Two USB 2.0 is being a single USB 3.0 so you can perform high-speed data transfer at all. We can include a USB keyboard and mouse to operate the Intel NUC.
LAN connector used is Gigabit Ethernet. I check using ethtool this device has the ability to auto negotiation 10Mbps / 100Mbps / 1000Mbps full duplex, so very fast.

In Intel NUC body mounted Wifi antenna that can be used for a wireless Internet connection to hotspots.

Gorgeous from Intel NUC is the absence of a VGA connector. That there is a built-in HDMI connector Intel ® High Definition Audio 2 subsystem is configured for 8-channel (7.1) digital audio output via HDMI 1.4a. It means we can use the Digital TV as a monitor with an HDMI connection. For those who still use VGA, can buy a VGA to HDMI adapter and it also

SkyDrive Windows 8.1, Download File Without Internet

Washington – After releasing a preview version of Windows 8.1 recently, Microsoft said that the final version will be released in August 2013. Windows 8.1 users will soon be able to access files on a Windows cloud-based storage service, SkyDrive, without having to connect to the Internet.
Microsoft announced that SkyDrive will be accompanied by support for offline access. Through SkyDrive service, users will be able to determine which files can be accessed without connecting to the Internet and then downloaded to the user’s device automatically.
Files that can be accessed offline will be easily identified when the user opens SkyDrive. In addition, Windows 8.1 users can also store files on SkyDrive in offline mode, which then can be directly uploaded when connected to the Internet network.
Tami Reller, Chief Financial Officer said the company’s Windows Windows 8.1 will be completed in August 2013. Reller did not say when the user can install updates to Windows 8.1. But, Reller showed several new features and functionality in Windows 8.1.
Windows 8.1 users will be looking for music that is integrated with Xbox Music and can share web pages into Xbox Music application to create playlists. Another breakthrough designed in Windows 8.1, namely, Miracast. This displays renewal HD video and audio from Wi-Fi to the other views, such as TV. And many more other renewal in Windows 8.1.

Review: First 8-inch Windows tablet is a device that shouldn’t exist

My dissatisfaction with PC OEMs is something I have documented in the past. They offer a confusing array of products and tend to cut corners in the worst ways imaginable. The OEM response to Windows 8 has been to produce a wide range of machines sporting novel form factors to fit all sorts of niches, both real and imagined.

One niche that the OEMs haven’t tried to fill, however, has been sub-10-inch tablets. That’s not altogether surprising. Microsoft designed Windows 8 for screens of 10 inches or more, and initially the operating system’s hardware requirements had a similar constraint.

That decision looked a little short-sighted after the success of tablets such as the Google Nexus 7 and the iPad mini. Accordingly, Microsoft changed the rules in March, opening the door to a range of smaller Windows tablets.

The Acer Iconia W3 is the first—and currently the only—8-inch Windows tablet. That attribute alone makes it in some sense noteworthy. Sadly, it’s about the only thing that does.

Spec-wise, this is another Intel Clover Trail tablet, and its internals are basically the same as the devices that launched last year (such as its bigger brother, the Acer Iconia W510). This means 1.8 GHz, dual core, four thread Intel Atom Z2760 CPU, 2 GB RAM, 64 GB flash storage (which with Acer’s default partitioning leaves a little over 29 GB usable), front and rear cameras, Bluetooth 4.0, and 802.11b/g/n (no 5 GHz support). There’s a micro-HDMI and micro-USB port for external connectivity (a separate cable converts the micro USB port into a full-size one), along with an SD card slot. The tablet has a speaker adequate for notification sounds but little more.

As a result, performance and battery life are similar to what we’ve seen before. The Iconia W3 comes equipped with full-blown Windows 8, unlike ARM tablets, so it can run any 32-bit

Microsoft still has ‘a way to go’ in determining its market for Windows 8, says Network Rail

Microsoft has “a bit of a way to go” in determining which market it is targeting for Windows 8, even though the operating system has now been on the market for over a year, Network Rail’s head of information systems strategy Simon Goodman has told Computing.

Goodman praised Microsoft’s early entries into hybrid-led technology via Windows 8, saying there was definitely “a need” for hybrid notebook-tablets, and that this was something Network Rail had “explored internally”.

“We’ve already looked at Surface-based devices,” confirmed Goodman.

“It gives you a combination of nice tablet looks and feel, a lightweight device, but it’s got a bit of grunt behind it, so if you need to do something a little bit more hefty from an applications perspective, you’ve got the tools and capabilities to do that,” he said.

But Goodman described the move from Windows 7 to 8, with its added Modern apps interface, as “a huge jump” for Microsoft, which could affect ease of adoption for some of Network Rail’s workers.

“If you’re a traditional desktop user, it’s quite difficult to get to the look and feel of how that works, and how to navigate around it,” said Goodman.

But Goodman maintained that, from a tablet perspective, “it’s not that hard to work out where you go, and everything else”.

However, Goodman is going to hold fire before rolling out any Windows 8 systems en masse at Network Rail.

“For me, it’s something we will look to embrace where it makes sense to do so, but I still think Microsoft has got a bit of a way to go yet to determine exactly what market it wants to play into,” said Goodman.

Look out for the full-length video interview with Network Rail’s Simon Goodman on Computing very soon.

Windows 7 Losing Steam in the Enterprise but Microsoft Holds Steady

While still the most popular operating system in the enterprise, including at midsize businesses, Microsoft Windows 7’s reality in this new age of business computing is that it is slowly losing market share. Mobile operating systems, like Android and iOS, and even Mac OS are quickly making inroads, largely driven by BYOD policies implemented by IT departments in the last few years.

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, Microsoft still rules the roost, however, as an overall analysis of current computer platform use at the enterprise revealed in late April at CITEWorld. Some businesses still use Windows XP. These companies still using XP need to take note that Microsoft is discontinuing support for the OS in April 2014.

Windows 8 Still to Come for the Midsize Business

In contrast to the leadership status held by Windows 7, Microsoft’s new OS, Windows 8, is making small inroads at the corporate level. Many midsize businesses appear hesitant to adopt 8, due to concerns about the usability of and training issues involved in rolling out the new tile-based operating system. Expect the next version of Windows to take steps to improve usability, including returning the Start button, and possibly offering an option to boot-up to the classic Desktop, instead of the newer Metro interface screen.

The CITEWorld article analyzes statistics revealed in a Forrest Research report on the growing operating system diversity at the enterprise. One statistic that perfectly illustrates the migration to alternate operating systems shows that while 67 percent of all computing devices were powered by a version of Windows in 2008, today 70 percent use alternatives. Of course, the rapid growth of mobile devices at the workplace played a major role in the increased diversity.

The Midsize Business Needs to Embrace Operating System Diversity

Even with Windows 7 losing market share, it is still a very

Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview Reflects the Growing Trend of Working Remotely

Microsoft unleashed Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview today. The early look at the enterprise version of Windows 8.1 follows the release of Windows 8.1 Preview at Microsoft’s BUILD conference last month, and includes a variety of tools that show Microsoft’s commitment to both BYOD and virtualization.

Aside from the slew of changes and enhancements in the regular Windows 8.1 Preview edition, Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview also includes features uniquely designed for business customers. Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview adds business-friendly elements like Direct Acess, and BranchCache. It also provides IT admins with the power to configure and lock down the Start screen on Windows 8 clients.

Microsoft also has tools in Windows 8.1 Enterprise Preview to help out with BYOD and virtualization: Windows To Go, and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI). Windows To Go lets the company put an entire managed Windows 8 desktop environment on a bootable USB thumb drive, and VDI gives the business the tools to enable users to use critical business software from virtually any Internet-connected device.

One of the hottest trends in business technology today is mobility and working remotely. The driving forces behind working remotely are the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend and virtualization.

More and more companies are embracing BYOD and allowing (or requiring) employees to provide their own PCs and mobile devices. BYOD can be a cost-cutting measure for the company, because the employee is taking on some (or all) of the burden of purchasing the PC. BYOD enables users to be more productive and have higher job satisfaction because they get to use the hardware they prefer, and are more comfortable with.

BYOD also introduces some unique concerns, though, when it comes to enforcing policies and protecting company data. Regardless of its benefits, companies can’t just let employees connect rogue computers to the network, or store sensitive company data on